How Does Mistletoe Harm Your Trees

Mistletoe Removal

Do you have mistletoe on your property? If you have mystyldene, all-heal, bird lime, golden bough, or devil’s fuge, then yes. You have mistletoe.

It’s leaves are part of a fun Christmas tradition that encourages you to a kiss while standing under it. But it’s actually very harmful to your trees. Although the evergreen plant is quite beautiful with the fragrant flowers it produces in winter, this poisonous berry does more harm than good.

Mistletoe is native to Nevada, California, Arizona, Baja California, as well as Sonora and Sinaloa, Mexico. Mistletoe is a semi-parasitic pest that grows on branches of deciduous trees, which his why you’ll want to have it removed by a professional.

How Does Mistletoe Harm Trees?

Mistletoe is a semi-parasitic plant that sends out its root-like structure into tree branches. This small evergreen shrub then steals necessary water and nutrients from its tree host. The mistletoe then continues to grow larger as it continues to damage the tree.

Although mistletoe spreads slowly, when not stopped it can be harmful to trees. When a tree is infested with the plant, it can become stunted, less vigorous and even be killed if additional stressed from other environmental factors are present. Things like root damage, drought, insect infestation, extreme temperatures, disease and mistletoe infestation can all kill an otherwise healthy tree.

If you see that mistletoe is growing on your trees, you can prune out the infested branches. But just cutting it with the branch won’t kill mistletoe; it’ll only slow down its growth. You can’t get rid of mistletoe unless you remove all the infected limbs of the tree. Special care must been taken to avoid over pruning, which is why you want to hire a professional arborist to walk this fine line for you. 

A professional arborist prune in a way that balances your need to eliminate mistletoe with your trees need to retain branches. At the same time they can also aid the tree in it’s recovery. Removing other stressors from your trees can help ensure their recovery and resistance to future infections.

How Often Should I Prune My Trees?

Tree Service Alamo

 

Most people in the East Bay should be pruning their trees between November and March. But how often should I prune my trees? Is it an annual tradition? What is best for my tree to ensure it grows and isn’t damaged? While it’s always best to speak to our certified arborist, the following are some basic guidelines that individuals should follow when determining pruning schedules:

Type of Tree

One of the key factors is the type of tree involved. Each tree type will react differently. For instance, fruit trees are generally pruned annually. On the other hand, oak trees should be trimmed every 2-3 years. Additionally, the tree type can also determine the ideal time to prune your tree. Thus, knowing your tree type is essential in determining the pruning schedule.

Age of the Tree

In addition to the tree type, the age of the tree also impacts how often you should prune it. Younger trees are usually pruned more often than older trees. If you had to find an average, most younger trees should be pruned every 2-3 years while older trees are trimmed every 3-5 years. This allows younger trees to flourish while helping to maintain established structures.

Tree Condition

The condition of a tree can dramatically affect the pruning timeframe as well. If a tree has a broken branch or loose/unstable areas, the tree may require trimming, even if it’s not “time”. Alternatively, if a younger tree is having trouble establishing its roots, it maybe recommended that the tree not be pruned as frequently for now.

Thus, if you are wanting to get your trees pruned or evaluated for trimming in the Bay Area, contact us. Sexy Trees has a certified arborist with years of experience.

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Berkeley Tree Pruning company, Llamas Tree Service, showcases this Cedar tree that looks sexy even two years after the last pruning.