Non-Invasive Tree Roots

Concord Tree Pruning

Non-invasive tree roots are a beautiful addition to your yard, providing beauty, structure, and shelter for birds and animals. Many homeowners avoid growing trees in their gardens because the roots can cause home foundations or plumbing pipes to break, resulting in costly repairs. An expert arborist can help you pick out the finest trees for your garden’s layout and those that won’t intrude on your plumbing.

Why Do Most Homeowners Prefer Trees with Non-Invasive Tree Roots?

The roots of a tree are its respiratory system. They absorb water and nutrients from the soil to transport them to the rest of the tree. The roots also anchor the tree in the ground and help it withstand strong winds. A tree’s root system can extend well beyond its branch spread. Some trees, like maples, have very shallow root systems that can easily damage underground pipes and foundations. Other trees, such as oaks, have deep taproots that are less likely to cause problems.

There are several reasons why you might want to choose trees with non-invasive tree roots for your garden:

  1. Avoid damage to your home’s foundation or plumbing: Most people choose trees with roots that are non-invasive to prevent damage to their home’s foundation or plumbing.
  2. Prevent soil erosion: Trees with deep roots help anchor the soil, preventing erosion.
  3. Provide shade and wind protection: Trees can provide shade for your home, reducing your cooling costs in the summer. They can also block out strong winds, providing protection for your home and garden.
  4. Attract wildlife: Many birds and animals rely on trees for food and shelter. By planting trees with less intrusive root systems, you can create a habitat for these creatures in your own backyard.
  5. Improve air quality: Trees produce oxygen and filter pollutants from the air, improving air quality in urban areas.

Which Tree Types Have Non-Invasive Systems?

There are many types of trees with non-invasive tree roots, including:

  1. Oaks: Oaks have deep taproots that anchor the tree in the ground. They are less likely to damage foundations or pipes than other tree types.
  2. Pines: Pines have shallow root systems that spread out wide, making them ideal for preventing soil erosion.
  3. Maples: Maples have shallow root systems that can easily damage underground pipes and foundations.
  4. Ashes: Ashes have deep taproots that make them resistant to high winds. They are also good at preventing soil erosion. 
  5. Elms: Elms have shallow root systems that can cause damage to foundations and pipes if they are not maintained.
  6. Fruit trees: Fruit trees have shallow root systems that can damage foundations and pipes if they are not maintained.

It’s important to consult with an arborist before planting any tree in your yard, as some tree roots can be very invasive. An arborist can help you choose the best tree for your garden’s layout and those that won’t intrude on your plumbing.

4 Types of Trees with Non-Invasive Roots that are Best for Your Yard

Ornamental Trees

Ornamental Trees non-invasive

Ornamental trees are a great solution for yards where you want the decorativeness of a beautiful tree without the risk of invasive roots. Ornamental trees grow to a manageable height and are designed to fit into smaller spaces and be easy to maintain. Many ornamental trees can even be grown in planters so that their roots have no chance of getting out of hand.

Popular ornamental tree varieties in California include – 

  • Japanese Maple
  • Crape Myrtle
  • Eastern Redbud
  • Cornus Mas
  • Serviceberry
  • Kousa Dogwood
  • Japanese Tree Lilac
  • Dwarf Korean Lilac
  • Star Magnolia
  • Crabapples: Red Jewel, Royal Raindrops, Prairiefire

Fruit Trees

Fruit Trees Non-invasive

Fruit trees not only look beautiful, but they can also provide a source of fruit for your family to enjoy when the right season comes around. Some fruit trees, like figs, can have voracious root systems that can quickly grow out of control. A greater variety of fruit trees can be made suitable for smaller gardens when pruned regularly and given routine tree care from a skilled arborist. If the tree is not allowed to grow too large the root system will not extend as far either. If in doubt, choose a beautiful decorative fruit tree variety that is known not to have invasive root systems.

The following fruit trees can be both ornamental for your garden and productive when it comes to providing fruit. 

  • Citrus
  • Adams crabapple
  • Cornelian cherry dogwood
  • Pawpaw
  • Dwarf Apple Tree
  • Dwarf Cherry Tree
  • Dwarf Pear Tree
  • Dwarf Apricot Tree
  • Dwarf Orange Tree
  • Dwarf Plum Tree

Shade Trees

shade trees non-invasive

Want the protection and coolness of shade from your tree without the extensive and invasive root system? There are varieties of trees that can provide you with thick foliage and fuller shade while still having smaller root systems. These trees can be a stunning focal point of your landscape without taking up too much space or overwhelming your garden with their root systems. Some with colored leaves and some with flowers, these shade trees can liven up small gardens while maintaining small root systems.

Here are some non-invasive shade trees varieties – 

  • Amur maple
  • Chinese pistache
  • Southern sugar maple
  • Red tip photinia
  • American hornbeam
  • Trident maple

Shrubs

shrubs non-invasive

Shrubs can provide good coverage, privacy, and protection for your garden. While some shrubs may look small, their root systems can grow quickly, so it’s important to choose the right variety for your garden. Shrubs create the perfect addition for smaller gardens where low-lying yet full plants are preferred.

Some of the most popular shrubs with non-invasive tree roots include – 

  • Hollywood juniper
  • Fraser photinia
  • Glossy abellia
  • Hydrangeas
  • Viburnums
  • Boxwoods
  • Gardenia
  • Barberries
  • Camellias
  • Hollies 

To keep your plumbing and home foundations safe, choose trees and shrubs with non-invasive root systems, and receive the professional advice of your arborist before planting.

When is the Best Time to Trim Trees: Fall, Spring, or Winter?

best time to trim trees

To prune or not to prune… That is the question.

There is no one “right” answer to the question of when is the best time to trim trees. Different trees respond differently to pruning, so it’s important to know your species before you take a saw to its branches! That being said, there are some general best practices that can help you decide when to trim your trees.

Knowing when to trim trees is important for a variety of reasons. This guide breaks down the best time to trim trees in order to keep them healthy and beautiful.

Why Is Pruning Important?

Pruning is an important pillar of tree care. It helps to:

  • Remove dead or diseased branches
  • Stimulate new growth
  • Improve the shape and appearance of the tree
  • Encourage fruit production (in some species)
  • Have certified climber make sure the tree is safe for the public

Well-pruned trees are healthier and stronger, with a reduced risk of damage from storms or other hazards. Dead branches, diseased trees and weak limbs are all more likely to cause problems during extreme weather conditions.

Pruning also helps to keep your trees looking their best. Overgrown trees can be unsightly, and poorly shaped trees can lose their aesthetic appeal. Regular pruning can help you maintain the natural shape of your tree, or even improve its appearance if it’s looking a little worse for wear.

What is the Best Time to Trim Trees?

Although there is no one-size fits all pruning guide, anytime between late fall and early spring is generally best. This is because the trees are dormant during this time and can better tolerate the stress of pruning.

Pruning in late fall and early spring helps to:

  • Reduce the risk of infection and disease
  • Stimulate new growth
  • Encourage fruit production (in some species)

Summer and Fall Pruning

In general, it’s best to avoid pruning in the summer and fall as it can be stressful for trees. When trees are not dormant, they are actively growing and producing new leaves, flowers and fruit. Pruning during this time can interfere with this process and damage the tree.

Additionally, pruning in the summer and fall can promote the spread of disease. This is because fungi spores are more prevalent in these seasons and can easily infect cuts made to trees.

However, there are some exceptions to this rule. If you need to remove dead or diseased branches, it’s best to do so as soon as possible. These branches can be a haven for pests and diseases, and can quickly spread to the rest of the tree if left unchecked.

Winter Pruning

Winter is also a good time to prune trees, as long as you take care not to damage the bark. Be extra careful when working with power tools in cold weather, as they can be more likely to malfunction.

Pruning in winter has its own set of benefits and drawbacks. On the plus side, pruning during this time can help to prevent frost damage and encourage new growth in the spring. However, it’s important to be aware that some trees are more susceptible to damage from cold weather. If you’re not sure how your tree will react, it’s best to consult with a professional before pruning.

Properly Trimming a Tree

Now that you know when the best time to trim trees, it’s time to learn how! Here are some tips to help you get started:

  1. Start by removing any dead, diseased or damaged branches. These limbs are a risk to the rest of the tree and should be removed as soon as possible.
  2. Next, focus on any branches that are rubbing against each other or other fixtures in your yard. Friction can damage the bark and should be trimmed back to avoid problems.
  3. If you’re looking to improve the shape or appearance of your tree, start by pruning back any overgrown branches.
  4. Remove suckers (or water sprouts) which are fast-growing shoots that often appear at the base of the tree.
  5. When trimming, make sure to cut back to a branch junction or bud. This will help encourage new growth in the right direction.
  6. Finally, avoid topping your trees! This is when the main trunk of the tree is cut back, leaving only stubs. Topping can damage trees and make them more susceptible to disease and damage in the future.

With these tips in mind, you’re ready to start trimming your trees! Just remember to take your time and work carefully to avoid damaging the tree. If you’re not confident in your pruning skills, it’s always best to consult with a professional. They can help you determine the best course of action for your tree.

How to Save a Dying Birch Tree: (Detection, Treatment, & Prevention)

how to save a dying birch tree

Fairytale white bark, dripping green foliage… Birch trees are beautiful and provide shade during the hot summer months, but they can be very sensitive to their environment. If they’re not taken care of, or if they’re subjected to pests or harsh conditions, they can quickly sicken and die. But how can you identify the warning signs – do you know how to save a dying birch tree?

We do. Here’s a quick guide on how to save a dying birch tree. Detect, treat, and prevent birch tree death, plus learn a few tips to keep your trees healthy and resilient!

Signs Your Tree is Failing to Thrive

Defoliation and Yellowing or Browning of Foliage

A common sign that a birch tree is unhealthy is when its foliage starts to die off or change color. If you notice that your birch tree’s leaves are yellowing, browning, or falling off prematurely, it’s important to take action immediately. This is usually a sign of pests or disease – both of which can quickly kill a birch tree if left unchecked.

Bark Discoloration and Dark Patches

When bark starts to discolor or develop soft, tarry, or dark patches, it can be a sign of disease, pests, or even physical damage to the tree. If you notice any changes in the color or texture of your birch tree’s bark, it’s important to have a professional take a look as soon as possible.

Leaf Spots, Blotches, and Blisters

Leaf spots, blotches, and blisters on birch trees can be caused by a variety of fungal diseases. If you notice any of these symptoms on your tree’s leaves, it’s important to act quickly. Fungal diseases can spread rapidly and kill a birch tree if left untreated.

Split Branches or Dead Branches

Dieback and canker diseases from various pathogens attack the bark and cambium layers of birch trees. Diseased tissue widens and kills living tissue underneath the bark. Knotty growths form on bark and girdle stems, or the bark may split, revealing dead wood underneath.

Treatment

Here are a few things you can do to save a sick or dying birch tree:

Identify if Pests are the Culprit

Birch trees are particularly susceptible to attack from borers, aphids, and mites. The adult Bronze Birch borer is yellowish brown with coppery wings, with white and elongated larvae. These pests eat away at the insides of the tree, blocking the food and water supply and creating a maze of damage. Treatment for borers is best done early – otherwise the tree cannot be saved. As soon as you notice dieback or identify pests, treat the tree with insecticide. 

 Diseased Branches

Prune Away the Diseased Branches

If your tree is suffering from a fungal disease, you’ll need to prune away the affected branches. This will help stop the spread of the disease and give your tree a chance to focus its energy on healing. Be sure to sterilize your pruning tools before and after use to prevent the spread of disease to other trees.

Related Reading: Birch Tree Roots Removal: When and How to Cut Them

Opt for a Professional Diagnosis

If you’re not sure what’s wrong with your tree or how to treat it, your best bet is to call in a professional tree care company with certified arborists. They will be able to quickly diagnose the problem and provide you with the best course of treatment.

How to save a dying birch tree?Prevention

Water and Fertilize Regularly

Birch trees are not drought-friendly. They need a lot of water, especially when they’re young. Make sure to water them regularly (about once a week), and fertilize them yearly in the spring. This will help them to stay healthy and resist pests and disease.

Mulch the Roots

Mulching the roots of your birch tree will help it to retain moisture and resist temperature extremes. It’s important to use an organic mulch, like wood chips or shredded bark, and to keep it away from the trunk of the tree.

Plant Low-Growing Plants Around the Base

If you live in an area with hot summers, planting low-growing plants around the base of your birch tree will help to keep the roots shaded and cool. This will help the tree to resist stress and disease. By following these tips, you’ll know how to save a dying birch tree. If you think your tree is beyond help, it’s important to remove it before it has a chance to spread disease to other trees. Call in a professional tree removal company to safely and quickly remove the problem tree.

Lichen on Trees: Hurtful or Harmless?

lichen on trees

Lichen, comprised of green algae and fungus, can be found in even the most inhospitable corners of the Earth. But should you be concerned if you notice lichen on trees in your yard? In this article, we’ll answer all of your questions about this weird and wonderful organism.

What is Lichen?

Most people think of lichen as a plant when in reality it’s the result of algae and fungus working together in a symbiotic relationship. The fungus provides the body in which the algae can live, protecting it from damaging conditions such as UV radiation and drought, while the algae provide food for the fungus through carbon dioxide, water, and sunlight.

Despite its unassuming appearance, lichen plays an important role in the ecosystem. The slow-growing organism is an important food source for animals like slugs, reindeer, and caribou. Lichen also provides shelter for small animals and helps to prevent soil erosion.

With over 13,000 species, lichen can be found in a variety of colors and shapes, from neon green to crusty black to deep orange. The organism is commonly seen on surfaces like rocks, trees, soil, and shrubs.

Lichen on Trees: Should I Be Concerned?

Contrary to popular belief, lichen is not harmful to trees. Lichen tends to be found on trees already in a state of decline and is rarely found on young, healthy trees. Furthermore, because this organism isn’t a plant, it doesn’t make roots that can penetrate the tree bark. It will simply sit on the surface of the tree.

The good news is that lichen isn’t causing the decline of your tree, but is merely a symptom of an underlying issue.

What Causes Lichen to Grow on Trees?

Lichen prefers sunlight and moisture, so you’re likely to find it in sunny spots that have been exposed to rain. If your tree has recently lost leaves or a branch, this creates favorable conditions for lichen growth.

Should I Remove Lichen From Trees?

Lichen isn’t harmful to trees, so there is no reason to get rid of it.

Removing lichen can actually damage the tree’s bark, opening the perfect entry point for pests and disease.

If you’re concerned about the appearance of lichen on your tree, simply prune away the most densely-covered branches.

The Benefits of Lichen

Lichen actually offers several benefits to homeowners and the ecosystem.

As we mentioned before, lichen is an important food source for animals. The slow-growing organism can also help to prevent soil erosion.

Some types of lichen can be used to make a natural dye, while others are used in traditional medicine.

Furthermore, since lichen consumes carbon dioxide as a primary food source, it plays a role in lowering air pollution.

Warning Signs of a Declining Tree

While lichen isn’t harmful to trees, it can be a warning sign of a declining tree. If you notice lichen on your tree, pay close attention to the overall health of the tree.

Some common signs of a declining tree include:

  • Sudden loss of leaves
  • Branches falling off
  • More discolored leaves than healthy leaves
  • Deep cracks in the tree’s bark or trunk
  • An abundance of critters (they prefer weakened, dead, or dying hosts)
  • Mushrooms or other fungi growing at the base of the tree
  • Leaning or odd growth patterns

If you notice any of these warning signs, contact a certified arborist for an assessment.

Preventing Lichen Growth on Trees

The best way to prevent lichen on trees is to ensure that your trees are healthy and strong.

Here are a few tips:

  • Water your trees regularly, especially during periods of drought.
  • Prune away dead or dying branches.
  • Add mulch around the base of the tree to help retain moisture.
  • Avoid wounding the tree bark with lawnmowers or string trimmers.
  • Inspect your trees regularly for signs of stress or decline.

By following these simple tips, you can help prevent lichen growth on your trees.

Contact a Certified Arborist

At Sexy Trees, our wide range of services and care will keep your trees healthy and beautiful for decades to come. We believe in supporting our communities of trees through evidence-based techniques that you can depend on. 

Give us a call at 925-233-6877 for an estimate, or email us at [email protected] anytime with questions!

Learn How to Trim a Palm Tree to Make it Stronger and Healthier

palm tree trimming

If you’re wondering how to trim a palm tree, wonder no more! In this blog post, we will teach you everything you need to know about palm tree trimming. Unlike many other plants, palm trees don’t need to be trimmed frequently in order to stimulate new growth. However, there are still certain times when it’s necessary to prune your palm tree. We’ll cover when and why you should trim a palm tree, as well as how to go about it safely and effectively. So whether you’re a beginner or an experienced gardener, read on for all the information you need to keep your palm trees looking healthy and beautiful!

Caring for Palm Trees

Palm trees are a California beach staple: they invoke images of tropical vacations, palm-lined streets, and sandy beaches. But what many people don’t realize is that palm trees are actually quite low-maintenance when it comes to care and upkeep, especially once they are established.

Young Palm Tree Care Guide

When palm trees are young, they will need a little more care and attention in order to ensure that they grow into healthy adults. For the first few years of their lives, palm trees should be fertilized regularly. This will help them to develop strong roots and fronds, as well as produce new leaves more quickly. Once palm trees are established, they will need to be fertilized less frequently.

As with any plant, watering is crucial for palm tree health. Young palm trees should be watered deeply and regularly, about once a week or more if necessary. Established palm trees can usually get by with being watered less frequently, about every two weeks or so.

Young Palm Tree Care Guide

Palm Tree Trimming and Pruning

When to Trim

As we mentioned previously, palm trees don’t need to be trimmed as frequently as other plants in order to encourage new growth. In fact, pruning healthy fronds will actually reduce food production and ultimately weaken the tree. So when should you trim a palm tree?

The most common rule of thumb for palm tree trimming is to break the cutters out when you notice dead or dying fronds. Removing dead fronds helps to keep the palm tree healthy and looking its best. Fronds that are brown or black, as well as those that are hanging down or drooping, are probably dead and should be removed.

Another reason you might need to trim a palm tree is if it has become too tall. If the palm tree is interfering with power lines, for example, it will need to be trimmed down.

How to Trim

When it comes time to actually trim your palm tree, there are a few things you’ll need in order to do the job safely and effectively. First, you’ll need a pair of cutting blades. This tool will help you clean the trunk, cut the leaves, and remove any fruits that might be present.

You’ll also need a pair of pruning shears. Pruning shears are versatile instruments that can be used for a variety of tasks, such as trimming branches and removing leaves. If you need to remove thicker or larger fronds, pruning shears will make the job much easier.

Finally, you’ll need a ladder. Palm trees can get quite tall! Make sure the ladder is tall enough to reach the palm tree’s fronds and set it up on level ground to avoid injury.

When trimming your palm tree, start by removing any dead or dying fronds. Once all of the dead fronds have been removed, you can begin trimming back any branches that are interfering with power lines or other objects. When trimming branches, make sure to cut them back to a main branch or trunk to avoid damaging the palm tree.

Finally, use your pruning shears to remove any leaves that are hanging down or drooping. Once all of the palm tree’s fronds have been trimmed, you can step back and admire your handiwork!

Why to Trim Palm Trees

Although palm trees can go long stretches between prunings, trimming off the dead fronds keeps them healthy and beautiful. A beautiful palm tree is a stunning addition to any landscape, and with a little bit of care, it will thrive.

So don’t be afraid to break out the cutting blades and pruning shears when your palm tree needs a trim!

Get in Touch With a Local Arborist 

At Sexy Trees, our wide range of services and care will keep your trees healthy and beautiful for decades to come. We believe in supporting our communities of trees through evidence-based techniques that you can depend on. 

Give us a call at 925-233-6877 for an estimate, or email us at [email protected] anytime with questions!

What Is a Tree Surgeon? 9 Things (2022) You Ought to Know

tree surgeon

What is a tree surgeon? A tree surgeon is someone who helps to maintain and care for trees. This can involve things like pruning, trimming, and removing branches or limbs that are damaged or dead. Tree surgeons can also be helpful in terms of public safety – by removing dangerous branches or limbs from trees, they can help minimize the risk of injury or property damage.

Fast Facts About Tree Surgeons

What does a Tree Surgeon Do?

A tree surgeon is a professional who is responsible for the health and well-being of trees. They may be called upon to perform a variety of tasks, including planting trees, caring for young trees, removing trees, and diagnosing and treating tree diseases.

Qualifications to Become a Tree Surgeon

To become a tree surgeon, one must first have a degree in forestry or arboriculture from a recognized institution. They need to have at least three years of experience working as a tree surgeon. Additionally, one must pass an examination given by the International Society of Arboriculture to become a licensed tree surgeon.

Importance and Safety Tree Surgeon Offers

Tree surgeons must be skilled in the use of ropes and climbing equipment to work safely at height, and must also be aware of the dangers posed by working with large trees. They may also use machinery such as chainsaws and stump grinders. When choosing a tree surgeon, it is important to select someone qualified and experienced.

How Much Experience is Needed to Be a Tree Surgeon

In order to be a tree surgeon, one will need at least five years of experience working with trees. This experience can be gained through working in arborist, landscaping, or forestry industries. One should also have a strong understanding of tree biology and how to properly care for trees. Additionally, it is important to be physically fit and able to safely climb and work in high places.

Typical Services Offered by Tree Surgeons

Tree surgeons offer a wide variety of services aimed at maintaining the health and appearance of trees. Some of the most common services provided by tree surgeons include pruning, cabling and bracing, and tree removal.

Insurance and Bonding for Tree Surgeons

Tree surgeons typically have a degree in horticulture, forestry, arboriculture, or landscape architecture. In order to protect the public, tree surgeons are often required to carry insurance. Bonding is also usually required, as it guarantees that the tree surgeon will complete the job properly and meet all safety regulations.

Benefits of Employing a Tree Surgeon

A well-trained tree surgeon can preserve a tree’s health and extend its life. Improved safety. They can assess the condition of a tree and make necessary repairs to make it safe. Well-maintained trees that add beauty and value to a property are often the work of experienced tree surgeons too.

Cost of Tree Surgery Services

The cost of tree surgery services can vary depending on the size and complexity of the job. Typically, though, you can expect to pay between $50 and $200 per hour for a tree surgeon’s services.

When To Call a Tree Surgeon

A tree surgeon is a professional who helps to maintain the health and appearance of trees. They may be called upon to remove dead or diseased branches, thin the canopy to allow more light through, or prune trees for safety reasons.

Trees that are healthy and well-maintained can add value to your property – so if you’re thinking of selling in the future, it’s worth considering hiring a tree surgeon to help keep your trees looking good!

Get in Touch With a Local Tree Surgeon

At Sexy Trees, our wide range of services and care will keep your trees healthy and beautiful for decades to come. We believe in supporting our communities of trees through evidence-based techniques that you can depend on. 

Give us a call at 925-233-6877 for an estimate, or email us at [email protected] anytime with questions!

Best Tips For Sycamore Tree Root Removal

sycamore tree root removal

If you have a sycamore tree on your property, it’s important to be aware of the roots. They can be a nuisance, growing under and around walkways, driveways, and foundations. Many property owners are faced with the task of sycamore tree root removal at some point. While sycamore trees are beautiful and provide shade, their large roots can cause problems for foundations, sidewalks, and driveways. 

Sycamore trees are notorious for growing a deep and wide root system. Additionally, as the tree grows larger, the roots can become more difficult to remove. Removing the sycamore roots as soon as possible is always advisable to prevent further damage. Here are 8 tips for sycamore tree root removal:

Check Local Laws Before Cutting

Tree preservation ordinances are implemented in different states in the United States. The California Sycamore tree belongs to this list. Sycamore roots have the tendency to emerge above the ground surface, however, cutting the roots is limited to a specific time of the year. To be certain, coordinate with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in your area or your city council. It is important to be familiar with the local laws. In some cases, you may need a permit before you can begin work.

Schedule Your Root Cutting During Late Winter or Early Spring

The roots of a sycamore tree often emerge above the surface which can cause damage to walkways and other paved surfaces. This is the main reason why regularly cutting their roots is essential. It would be ideal to cut sycamore roots during late winter or early spring. Cutting sycamore tree roots during winter can lead to dehydration. Additionally, avoid cutting the roots after buds start to appear on the tree. This can cause stress which can lead to extensive defoliation, twig death, and shoot dieback.

Locate Roots

This is one of the challenging parts that you need to do before you can begin cutting your sycamore tree roots. Check buckling and warping on the surface areas where you think roots are starting to emerge. Dig down to be able to confirm and locate the roots.

Identify Areas to Cut

Ideally, you need to identify the parts of the sycamore roots that are beginning to grow closer to the ground that may cause damage to your property. You can use a shovel to dig around the trench area on both sides of the roots to further expose it for easier cutting. 

However, locating roots that are under a hard surface can be quite challenging. You might want to seek the help of an arborist to be able to prevent damage to your tree.

Cut the Roots

Cut the smaller roots, preferably the ones with a diameter of 2 inches or less using shears. Try to create a clean cut by cutting straight through the root. You can use a handsaw for roots with bigger diameters.

Remember that you are only limited to no more than 25% of the roots growing under the canopy of the tree when cutting. If you are certain, seek help from an arborist to have your sycamore tree roots cut by a professional.

There are several ways to remove a sycamore tree root. The most common and the least expensive is digging around the roots with a shovel or a pickax. You can also use the root’s natural inclination for climbing against gravity by cutting it off at the base of the tree, but this will take much more time and effort. Regardless of what approach you choose in addressing this root problem, it would be best to seek help from a professional landscaping company or professional.

Consult with an Arborist

Maintaining tree roots in your yard and garden can be quite challenging. The same is true when dealing with invasive sycamore tree roots. Call us at Sexy Trees to put an end to your root problems. We are just a phone call away!

4 Sexy Shade Trees with Shallow Roots

shade trees with small root systems

Shallows, or trees with shallow root systems, are commonly featured in landscaped homes and properties. Shallow shade trees with small root systems feature roots that are only capable of growing 4 to 8 inches into the ground. 

Root systems of shallows are so superficial that you can practically see them above the ground. In fact, most of its visible and surface roots are above ground and can be a nuisance in most yards. Despite being a common tripping hazard, shallow shade trees are still considered staples in most landscaped properties.

Shade Trees With Small Root Systems

If you are looking for shade shallow trees for your yard, here are some of the top choices you might want to consider as a new addition to your stunning property.

Willow Trees

Willows are deciduous trees and shrubs of the genus Salix. They are found around the world in a variety of habitats, including wetlands, floodplains, and riparian zones.

All types of willow trees feature shallow root systems. The most preferred landscaping trees under this variety are the willow tree family: the corkscrew willow, white willow, and weeping willow. They come in varying heights with the white willow growing the tallest at 65 feet at maturity. Meanwhile, the corkscrew willow grows the smallest with only 25 feet at maturity. Willow trees grow very fast but are very susceptible to wind damage due to the brittleness of their wood.

Ash Trees

Similar to willow trees, all ash trees have shallow roots too. What makes them ideal for landscaping is the fact that they can grow in any type of soil. They too grow fast but not as fast as the willow trees. Mature ash trees can grow as high as 50 feet to 80 feet tall with average widths ranging from 50 to 70 feet wide.

This deciduous tree features leaves that turn yellow, purple, and maroon during autumn, a lovely sight that makes it a popular option for landscaping.

Sugar Maples

The Sugar Maple is another favorite landscape tree that features shallow roots. However, unlike the other shade trees with small root systems, the sugar maple roots spread far from the trunk of the tree. This feature requires extra maintenance. 

Sugar maple trees thrive in both sunny and shady locations. During summer, it features a dense shade, ideal for the weather. Its beauty can be enjoyed the most during autumn when the tree features bright colored leaves. They can grow as high as 80 feet tall. However, unlike the willow and ash trees, sugar maples take longer before they can reach their maturity.

Pin Oak Tree

The Pin Oak is a type of oak tree that features very shallow roots. They grow very fast and thrive best in places with a lot of sunlight. It has an oval-shaped canopy with a thick trunk that is covered by branches and leaves. The leaves are shaped like oaks, but they have a different texture than other types of oaks. The bark is also quite different from other types of oaks, giving it its name “pin” oak tree because it has small spikes that look like pins sticking out from the trunk.

They mature quite fast and can reach 80 feet tall with their canopy stretching as much as 50 feet wide. It is a beautiful sight to behold in parks and other large lawns and properties. Unlike the rest of the trees in this list, the pin oak retains most of its leaves throughout the winter season.

Get in Touch with Expert Arborists

Planning to add beautiful shallows to your property? Sexy Trees can help. Our expert arborists and landscape artists are experienced in caring for the trees on your property. We have an eye for beauty!

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Birch Tree Roots Removal: When and How to Cut Them

Birch Tree Roots Removal

Do you have a birch tree on your property? These striking trees with white, papery bark and leaves that turn yellow in the fall are popular choices for ornamental landscaping. But before you plant a birch tree, it’s essential to be aware of its watering needs. Birch trees require high amounts of moisture, and their roots will search far and wide to find water sources. This extensive root system can cause problems for homeowners, including buckling sidewalks and driveways, making it difficult to mow the lawn, and causing other damage. If you find yourself in this situation, you may be wondering about birch tree roots removal. This article will outline how to remove birch tree roots with minimal impact on the tree’s health.

Take Caution Before Deciding to Cut

Birch trees are beautiful and provide many benefits, so cutting birch tree roots should only be a last resort after exhausting all other options. Cutting roots weakens the tree and makes it more susceptible to damage. If you’re considering birch tree roots removal, consult with a certified arborist first. An arborist will be able to assess the situation and advise you on the best course of action.

When to Cut Birch Tree Roots

The time of year is essential when deciding to cut birch tree roots. The best time is in autumn when the tree can direct all its energy to the roots instead of sending it upwards to support the leaves on the branches.

Birch Tree Roots Removal

Determine Which Roots are Safe to Cut

There are two types of birch tree roots: feeder roots and structural roots. Feeder roots are the thin, delicate roots that absorb water and nutrients from the soil – these are the roots you want to cut. Structural roots are the thick, sturdy roots that hold up the tree. Cutting these roots puts the tree at risk of falling.

Use a Saw or Axe to Cut the Roots

Make sure that you are using the correct tool for the job. A saw is suitable for cutting small roots, while you can use a sharpened ax to cut larger roots. Be careful when using these tools, as they can be dangerous. Do your best to cut the root in clean, even strokes – jagged edges will be more susceptible to infection or fungal growth.

Cut the Roots Away from the Trunk

When cutting birch tree roots, it is crucial to cut them as far away from the tree’s trunk as possible. Cutting away from the trunk will minimize the stress on the birch tree.

Proactively Prevent Root Damage

If you have a birch tree on your property, take steps to prevent root damage by ensuring the tree has enough water. Water birch trees deeply and regularly during the growing season, using a soaker hose or drip irrigation system to avoid wetting the foliage. Mulching around the tree’s base will also help retain moisture and keep roots cool. With proper care, you can enjoy your birch tree for many years to come.

Get in Touch With a Local Arborist 

At Sexy Trees, our wide range of services and care will keep your trees healthy and beautiful for decades to come. We believe in supporting our communities of trees through evidence-based techniques that you can depend on. 

Give us a call at 925-233-6877 for an estimate, or email us at [email protected] anytime with questions!

The Best Small Trees With Non-Invasive Roots

best small trees with non-invasive roots

If you’re looking for the best small trees to plant in your yard, you’ll want to consider those with non-invasive roots. Many tree species have expansive root systems that can damage sidewalks, driveways, and foundations. But there are a number of trees with shallow roots that won’t cause any trouble. As qualified arborists, we can help you choose the best small trees with non-invasive roots for your landscape and climate. So if you’re worried about invasive roots, don’t be! We’ve got you covered.

Who Should Choose Trees With Non-Invasive Roots?

People who should consider planting trees with non-invasive roots include those who have:

  • A tight budget – these trees are generally less expensive than their invasive counterparts
  • Limited yard space – trees with invasive roots tend to need more space than those with non-invasive roots
  • Homes with underground infrastructure such as water and sewer lines – the roots of many trees can cause damage to these lines

Best Small Trees With Non-Invasive Roots

When choosing new trees for your yard, keep in mind your local climate and soil type. Most of these trees will thrive in the Bay Area with adequate water and care.

Here are ten of the best small trees with non-invasive roots:

  1. The Chinese Pistache is a medium-sized tree that can reach up to 30 feet tall. It has reddish-brown bark and clusters of red berries in the fall.
  2. The Japanese Maple is a beautiful tree that is ideal for small yards. It grows to be about 15 feet tall and has red leaves in the fall.
  3. Orange Trees are drought-tolerant and can thrive in areas with little water. They grow to be about 20 feet tall and have fragrant flowers and fruit.
  4. The Crepe Myrtle is a small tree that grows to be about 15 feet tall. It has smooth, cinnamon-colored bark and blooms white flowers in the summer.
  5. Sweet Bay Magnolias are slow-growing trees that can reach up to 30 feet tall. They bear fragrant white flowers in the spring and green leaves year-round.
  6. The Redbud is a small, deciduous tree that grows to be about 20 feet tall. It has pink flowers in the spring and heart-shaped leaves.
  7. The Chitalpa Tashkentensis is a fast-growing tree that can reach up to 30 feet tall. It has lacy pink and white flowers in the summer and green leaves year-round.
  8. The Bronze Loquat is a small tree that grows to be about 15 feet tall. It has bronze leaves and edible fruit.
  9. The Arbutus ‘Marina’ is an evergreen tree that grows to be about 20 feet tall. It has red bark and white flowers in the winter, followed by a bitter red fruit that can be processed into jams or baked goods.
  10. Fruitless Olive Trees are a great option for people who don’t want to deal with fruit dropping from their trees. These beauties grow to be about 20 feet tall and have dark green leaves.

If you are having trouble selecting the ideal tree for your yard space, our arborists are here to help. We can recommend the best trees for your climate and soil type, so you can rest assured that your new tree will thrive.

Get in Touch With an Arborist 

At Sexy Trees, our wide range of services and care will keep your trees healthy and beautiful for decades to come. We believe in supporting our communities of trees through evidence-based techniques that you can depend on. 

Give us a call at 925-233-6877 for a schedule an estimate, or email us at [email protected] anytime with questions!